Contents  
Chapter- 1: General
Chapter- 2: History
Chapter- 3: People
Chapter- 4: Agriculture & Irrigation
Chapter- 5: Industries
Chapter - 6: Banking, Trade & Commerce
Chapter - 7: Communications
Chapter - 8: Miscellenous Occupation
Chapter - 9: Economic Trends Part 1
Chapter - 9: Economic Trends Part 2
Chapter - 10: General Administration
Chapter - 11: Revenue Aministration
Chapter - 12 : Law & Order and Justice
Chapter - 13 : Other Departments
Chapter - 14 : Local Self Government Part1
Chapter - 14 : Local Self Government Part2
Chapter - 14 : Local Self Government Part3
Chapter - 15 : Education and Culture
Chapter - 16 : Medical & Public Health Services
Chapter - 17 : Other Social Services

 

Chapter - 18 :  Public Life and Voluntary Social Service Organisations
Chapter - 19 : Places of Interest
Chapter - 20 : Glossary

CHAPTER - XIV
LOCAL SELF - GOVERNMENT.

Part 2

Taxes on entry of goods into the markets and sales therein : Taxes on entry of goods into the markets and sales therein , as source of revenue from the District Council 's own resources, occupies the third position. Receipts from this source, is increasing but not at any uniform rate. From an amount of Rs.19,069/- in 1953-54 , the receipt from this source increased to Rs.50,975/- in 1957-58 but fell to Rs. 44,437/- in 1958-59. In 1959-60 , it amounted to Rs.61,316/-. It again declined to Rs.41,072/- in 1960-61 but rose to a peak mark of Rs.71,722/- in 1963-64. During the year 1964-65 , receipts from this source again declined to Rs.40,918/-. Unsatisfactory collection of revenue led to the accumulation of bulk arrears during the last 10 years. From a meagre amount of Rs.760/- in 1954-55, the cumulative arrear has amounted to Rs.83,254/- in 1964-65.

There are 27 bazars in the Karbi under control of the District Council of Karbi. The bazars are leased by auction to the highest bidder called Bazar Mahaldars for a term of one year. These Mahaldars collect taxes as per rates prescribed by the District Council from the shopkeepers who brings goods into the markets for sale therein . The table below shows the demand , collection, and arrears of taxes on goods into the markets and sales therein. Correct picture of arrear cannot be obtained due to lack of irregular assessment in bazars.

Year

Demand

Rs

Collection

Rs

Cumulative Arrear

Rs

1

2

3

4

1953-54

1954-55

1955-56

1956-57

1957-58

1958-59

1959-60

1960-61

1961-62

1962-63

1963-64

1964-65

1965-66

19,069

22,650

31,655

43,246

57,708

73,408

91,512

81,751

96,994

1,23,170

1,42,004

1,24,172

1,68,254

19,069

21,890

25,819

36,879

50,975

44,437

61,316

41,072

46,734

46,346

71,722

40,918

N.A.

....

760

5,836

6,367

6,733

28,971

30,196

40,679

50,260

76,824

69,282

83,254

N.A.

Taxes on trades, callings and professions : Taxes on trades include licence fee etc., levied by the District Council on non-tribal traders under the Mikir Hills District ( Trading By Non-Tribals) Regulation, 1953. The revenue from this source is small. From Rs.1,145/- in 1953-54, the receipts under this head increased to Rs.25,549/- in 1964-65 without any arrears . The table shows the demand and collection of taxes on trades :-

Year

Demand

Rs

Collection

Rs

Year

Demand

Rs

Collection

Rs

1

2

3

4

5

6

1953-54

1954-55

1955-56

1956-57

1957-58

1958-59

1959-60

1,145

3,036

5,837

7,396

18,453

18,239

16,305

1,145

3,036

5,837

7,396

18,453

18,239

16,305

1960-61

1961-62

1962-63

1963-64

1964-65

1965-66

N.A.

14,577

14,491

16,018

25,529

25,549

17,000

N.A.

14,577

14,491

16,018

25,529

25,549

N.A.

N.A.

Taxes on vehicles : Taxes on vehicles mainly comprises the taxes levied by the District Council on carts, cycles and boats under the Mikir Hills (Cart, Cycle And Boat ) Taxation Act,1954. Besides , the District Council is also entitled to a share of the 60 % of the taxes on motor vehicles collected by the State Govt. The revenue from this is fluctuating from year to year and the highest receipt from this source was Rs.20,324/- in 1958-59.The rates of taxes at present, levied by the District Council under the above mentioned Act are as follows :- (a) Private cart Rs.4.00 (b) Business cart Rs.12.00 (c) Cycle Rs.2.00 (d) Boat (i) Rs.6.00 (upto 10 mds. capacity) (ii) Rs.10.00 (upto 50 mds. capacity) (iii) Rs.20.00 (above 50 mds. capacity)

The following table shows demand and collection of vehicle taxes in Karbi upto 1964-65 :-

Year

Demand

Rs

Collection

Rs

Year

Demand

Rs

Collection

Rs

1

2

3

4

5

6

1953-54

1954-55

1955-56

1956-57

1957-58

1958-59

-

96

1,151

1,987

9,413

20,324

-

96

1,151

1,987

9,413

20,324

1959-60

1960-61

1961-62

1962-63

1963-64

1964-65

2,726

6,988

1,548

3,354

1,396

281

2,726

6,988

1,548

3,354

1,396

281

Taxes on ferries : A number of ferries are under the control of Karbi District Council. These ferries are auctioned by open bid for a term of one year to the highest bidder called mahaldars. These mahaldars collect taxes from passengers and on goods carried by boats across the river as per rates prescribed by the District Council. The revenue from this source is also fluctuating from year to year . In 1964-65, the collection from this source was Rs.6,455/-. The highest amount collected from this source was Rs.12,237/- in 1956-57. The rates of taxes on passengers and goods carried by boats are prescribed by the District Council of Karbi. The following table shows the demand, collection and cumulative arrears of taxes.

Year

Demand

Rs

Collection

Rs

Cumula tive arrears

Year

Demand

Rs

Collection

Rs

Cumula tive arrears

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

1953-54

3,205

1,639

1,566

1956-57

14,270

12,237

4,034

1954-55

3,565

3,365

1,766

1957-58

19,590

8,071

15,553

1955-56

11,095

10,860

2,001

1958-59

C.3,135

A.15,553

T.18,688

3,807

14,882

1959-60

C. 2,300

A. 14,881

T. 37,881

5,121

12,060

1960-61

C. 3,200

A. 12,060

T. 15,260

9,145

6,115

1960-62

C.12,600

A.6,115

T. 37,881

6,183

12,532

1962-63

C. 6,000

A. 12,532

T. 15,260

8,875

9,657

1963-64

C.10,000

A.9,657

T.19,657

11,433

8,224

1964-65

C.10,000

A. 82,24

T.18,224

6,455

7,769

Taxes on cattle pounds : The District Council of Karbi is maintaining a number of cattle pounds for the control of the astray cattle. Like ferries and bazars, the cattle pounds are auctioned by open bid for a term of one year to the highest bidder who collects taxes from the owners whose cattles found place in cattle pounds. The revenue from this source was Rs.3,318/- in 1964-65. The following table shows the receipts from the cattle pounds since 1953-54 :-

Year

Demand

Rs

Collection

Rs

Year

Demand

Rs

Collection

Rs

1

2

3

4

5

6

1953-54

1954-55

1955-56

1956-57

1957-58

1958-59

558

470

432

761

976

1,401

558

470

432

761

976

1,401

1959-60

1960-61

1961-62

1962-63

1963-64

1964-65

2,095

2,762

2,441

3,669

3,949

3,318

2,095

2,762

2,441

3,669

3,949

3,318

Grazing Taxes : Under the Mikir Hills Grazing Regulation, 1953, taxes are levied on animals kept other than for domestic purposes. The rates of taxes are - buffaloe Rs.6/-, cow Rs.4/- and elephant Rs.15/- per head per annum. The revenue from grazing tax has increased from Rs.8,959/- in 1953-54 to Rs.21,421/- in 1964-65. The highest amount collected was Rs.24,844/- in 1961-62. The collection of grazing tax is not satisfactory and the cumulative arrear is showing an upward trend. In 1964-65, the cumulative arrear amounted to Rs.40,205/- from that of Rs.1,256/- in 1953-54. The following table shows the receipts from the grazing tax :-

Year

Demand

Collection

Current

Rs

Arrear

Rs

Total

Rs

Current

Rs

Arrear

Rs

Total

Rs

Remission

Rs

Cummulstive Arrear

Rs

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1953-54

1954-55

1955-56

1956-57

1957-58

1958-59

1959-60

1960-61

1960-61

1962-63

1963-64

1964-65

11,114

14,054

13,070

15,610

13,443

14,769

14,516

15,459

17,667

18,029

18,577

24,554

-

1,256

2,515

1,924

12,902

12,553

20,676

21,325

28,971

22,268

33,911

37,071

11.414

16,312

13,585

17,534

25,345

27,322

35,192

36,784

46,638

40,297

22,488

61,625

8,959

11,539

11,146

4,382

5,300

2,500

3,869

-

5,490

300

1,903

2,758

-

1,256

2,171

250

8,492

4,135

9,999

7,752

18,354

6,086

13,514

18,663

8,959

12,795

13,317

4,632

13,792

6,635

13,868

7,752

24,844

6,386

15,417

21,421

-

-

345

-

-

12

-

61

525

-

-

-

1,256

2,515

1,924

12,902

12,553

20,675

21,325

28,971

19,843

33,911

37,071

40,205

Stamps : The collection from the sale of District Council stamps is also increasing gradually and amounted to Rs.10,464/- in 1964-65. The following table shows the receipts from the sale of stamps by the Karbi District Council :-

(In Rupees )

Year

Demand

Rs

Collection

Rs

Year

Demand

Rs

Collection

Rs

1956-57

1957-58

1958-59

1959-60

1960-61

4,780

5,467

6,821

6,502

9,819

4,780

5,467

6,821

6,502

9,819

1961-62

1962-63

1963-64

1964-65

8,150

9,113

12,771

10,464

8,150

9,113

12,771

10,464

Grants -in-Aid from State Govt. : Grants from State Govt. is another important source of District Council 's revenue. These grants may be broadly divided into three categories (i) grants for the normal administration (ii) grants for primary education and (iii) grants for other development works. Grants for the normal administration is not the recurring feature ; only in the year of 1953-54, an amount of Rs.1,25,000/- was received by the District Council of Karbi. The grants for primary education and other development works are sanctioned annually against the specified schemes. Grants under these two heads are showing an upward trend since 1953-54. Grants for primary education has increased substantially since 1961-62 with the transfer of Primary Schools and Junior Basic Schools from Govt. to the District Council . Below table shows the grants and loans received by the District Council of Karbi since 1953-54.

Yeare

GRANTS FOR

Normal

adminis

tration

Rs

Primary

education

works

Rs

Other de-

velopment Rs

Total

Rs

Loan

received

Rs

Loan

repaid

Rs

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

1953-54

1954-55

1955-56

1956-57

1957-58

1958-59

1959-60

1960-61

1962-63

1963-64

1964-65

1965-66

1,25,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

7,330

10,840

13,840

13,800

7,189

29,250

20,000

79,850

2,15,177

5,22,967

5,49,067

4,11,970

9,94,448

37,100

1,01,470

2,32,540

1,60,455

1,79,923

2,04,437

1,68,267

2,43,112

1,69,312

3,02,179

2,44,190

2,91,250

2,77,800

1,69,430

1,12,297

2,46,380

1,74,255

1,87,112

1,88,267

1,88,267

3,22,962

3,84,489

8,25,146

7,93,257

7,03,220

1,27,248

60,000

-

50,000

50,000

1,97,753

13,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

15,000

-

-

-

16,504

-

-

-

-

-

-

Expenditure : The total expenditure of the District Council of Karbi was Rs.20,93,724/- in 1964-65. This is over seven times what it was in 1953-54. The main heads of expenditure of the District Council may be divided into four viz., establishment , education, development works and all other expenditures (including buildings eic.). The details of expenditure under these heads prior to 1960-61 is not available and hence the description of expenditure given below under different heads relates to the later years.

Establishment : The expenditure under establishment includes the pay etc., of officers and staff including District Council Members but excluding education. The expenditure under this head is maintaining an upward trend since 1960-61. From Rs.3,81,908/- in 1960-61, it had increased to Rs.3,94,778/- in 1962-63 and to Rs.4,52,641/- in 1963-64. It further rose to Rs.5,17,560/- in 1964-65. The steep rise in expenditure in the last two years was mainly accounted to the revision of pay etc., of the staff.

Education : There had been a spurt increase in expenditure on education during 1960-62. From Rs.1,11,953/- in 1960-61, the expenditure on education had increased to Rs.4,42,034/- in 1962-63 and again to Rs.7,82,293/- in 1964-65.

Development Works : Development Works undertaken by the District Council of Karbi mainly comprises rural communication, rural water supply, beautification of town, local development works, improvement of bazar etc. These development works are undertaken by the District Council from its own funds as well as from the grants received from State Govt. against schemes. The amount of expenditure on development works incurred by the District Council from its own funds since 1960-61 is gradually on decline except a slight rise in 1964-65 and as regards the amount of expenditure from Govt. grants no uniform pattern is visualised. The total amount of expenditure on development works from both the sources was Rs.4,09,219/- in 1960-61, and it rose to Rs. 4,43,294/- in 1964-65 with certain fluctuations during the years of 1961 to 1963.

Other Expenditures : This head mainly comprises expenditure incurred on buildings etc., and any other expenditure not included in the above described heads. The District Council since its establishment has constructed a good number of buildings like District Council Office, Members Hostel, Executive Member's residences and residential quarters for its employees etc. The amount of expenditure incurred under this head was Rs.3,50,577/- during 1964-65. The following table shows the details of expenditure of Karbi District Council :-

Statement showing the details of expenditure of District Council of Karbi since 1960-61 to 1964-65.

Year

Expenditure

on establishment

ie building &

pay etc., of

officers and

staff incluing

District Council

Members but excluding rducation

Education

Development works

All other

expenditure

ie building & others not included in other column

Grand Total

Head of the Department Work

From Councilors own resources

From Govt.

Grants

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

1960-61

3,81,908.00

1,11,953.00

1.Rural communi-

cations.

2.Rural water supply

3.Self help.

4.Beautification of towns

5.Local development works

6.Expansion of primary education

Total

1,59,311.00

7,029.00

15,964.00

7,819.00

Nil

3,277.00

1,93,400.00

25,789.00

55,909.00

47,892.00

23,456.00

52,941.00

9,832.00

2,15,819.00

2,80,047.00

11,83,127.00

Statement showing the details of expenditure of District Council of Karbi since 1960-61 to 1964-65.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1962-62

3,90,297.00

2,85,631.00

1.Rural communi-cations

2.Rural water supply

3.Self help.

Total

1,30,926.00

2,364.00

15,471.00

1,48,761.00

41,072.00

22,828.00

46,414.00

1,10,314.00

1,32,482.00

10,67,485.00

1962-63

3,94,778.00

4,42,034.00

1.Rural communi-cations

2.Rural water supply

3.Self help.

4.Self help.enterprise

5.Beautification of towns

6.Local development works

7.Expansion of primary education

8.Improvement of

bazars

Total

1,11,776.00

3,524.00

19,956.00

-

7,828.00

-

11,470.00

5,556.00

1,60,110.00

70,873.00

55,362.00

59,867.00

8,815.00

23,484.00

37,634.00

37,634.00

2,009.00

2,92,454.00

1,69,899.00

14,59,275.00

Statement showing the details of expenditure of District Council of Karbi since 1960-61 to 1964-65.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1963-64

4,52,641.00

6,49,558.00

1.Rural communi-cations

2.Rural water supply

3.Self help.

4.Self help.enterprise

5.Beautification of towns

6.Local development works

7.Regeneration of forest

8.Expansion of primary education

Total

66,965.00

2,535.00

2,817.00

-

8,139.00

-

9,074.00

10,596.00

1,00,126.00

67,407.00

43,711.00

8,450.00

1,770.00

24,416.00

32,869.00

27,223.00

31,786.00

2,37,632.00

2,18,803.00

16,58,760.00

1964-65

5,17,560.00

7,82,293.00

1.Rural communi-cations

2.Rural water supply

3.Self help.enterprise

4.Beautification of towns

5.Regeneration of forest

6.Expansion of primary education

7.Improvement of bazars

Total

1,40,932.00

10,858.00

-

5,676.00

15,141.00

14,494.00

700.00

1,87,801.00

1,04,285.00

32,571.00

12,702.00

17,028.00

45,424.00

43,483.00

-

2,55,493.00

3,50,577.00

20,93,724.00

North Cachar Hills District Council : It came into being on 29th April 1952. It has a jurisdiction over an area of 4,890 sq. kilometre with a population of 54,319. It consists of 16 members out of which 12 are elected by adult franchise and rest are nominated by the Governor. This composition determined in 1951 is still continuing . The first election to the District Council was held along with the First General Elections in the country in 1952 and since then it is being held along with the General Elections of the country.

In the First General Elections there was one political party in the field, called the Progressive People's Party which aet up candidates for the most of the areas and won the elections. There were independent candidates in several constituences but all of them lost. The party position after the 1st Elections and nomination was : Progressive People's Party and Independents supporting the Progressive People's Party 15 , and 1 Independent member in opposition. Later on 2 members of Progressive People's Party defected and joined the opposition . This position continued till sometimes in 1953 when one of the members of opposition resigned to accept a judicial post in the Council. This member, being nominated one, another man was nominated in his place, who sided with the ruling Party, and this position continued till the next election. In the elections of 1957, there were two political parties in the field , the ruling Progressive People's Party and the North Cachar Hills People's Welfare Union which had been formed by the opposition members. There were straight contests the two parties in all the 12 contituencies. The People's Welfare Party won 9 of the 12 seats, the ruling party being able to retain only 3 seats. Of the 4 nominated members, one joined the People's Welfare Union and the three joined the other party. The People's Welfare Union , thus, formed the Executive Committee. But in January 1961, the Executive Committee resigned, facing a no-confidence motion and according to Assam Autonomous District (Constitution of District Council s) Rules 1951, a care taker Committee was appointed by the Governor from amongst the members of the Congress Party (the Progressive People's Party merged with the Indian National Congress Party soon after 1957 elections). The care -taker Committee continued till the next elections, the party position during this period being Congress 9 and Wefare Union 7. In the elections in 1962, there was again a straight contest between the two parties and the result was a tie , each party capturing 6 seats. All the nominated members, however, joined the Congress Party and thus the Congress Party formed the Executive Committee and this position is still continuing.

Administrative set up : The District Council administration consist of three wings, namely (i) the Legislature (ii) the Executive Committee and (iii) the Judiciary. The District Council in-session functions as Legislature. The Chairman of the District Council presides over the meetings of the Council and occupies a position analogous to that of Speaker of the Legislative Assembly. He has no executive function. All the executive functions of the District Council are vested in the Executive Committee . The District Council Court forms the judiciary which is independent of the Executive.

The Chairman of the District Council has his own office with the Secretary to the District Council to assist him. The Executive Committee has its own office which is divided into different departments and branches for the convenience of administration . The staff including the judges of the District Council courts are appointed by the Executive Committee , the general principle, guiding appointment being that, all other things being equal , local tribal candidates are to be given preferences in matters of appointment.

Legislative Department : All matters relating to summoning of the Session of the District Council , questions, resolutions, motions, drafting of bills etc., Pay and T.A. Bills of the members , Chairman, Deputy Chairman and all other matters relating to sessions of the District Council and Sub- Committees formed by it including preparation of proceedings and circulation of all such papers to the Members are dealt with in the Department.

Judiciary Department : The Judiciary under the District Council of North Cachar Hills consists of two courts i.e., District Council Court and the Sub-ordinate District Council Court. There is a Judge for the District Council and a Sub-ordinate Judge for the Sub-ordinate District Council Court. The District Council Court exercises its judicial functions as an appellate authority against the orders and decisions of the Sub-ordinate District Council Court. The Sub-ordinate District Council Court exercises its powers both in its original jurisdiction as well as an appellate for hearing appeals against the decision of the village council.

Executive Department : The Executive Department of the District Council , North Cachar Hills , may be sub-divided into five following branches, and Secretary to the Executive Committee is the head of the Executive Department.

General Administration Branch : The branch deals with such subjects as agriculture, public health and sanitation, villages and town committees and councils and markets etc.

Revenue Branch : All matters relating to land and revenue are dealt by this branch . It is responsible for assessment of land revenue and house-tax and collection of the same. The allotment of land for various purposes and settlement of the same with raiyats are also done by this branch. Besides these regular works, the assessment and collection of grazing tax and sale of fisheries and collection of revenue there-from and similar other subjects are dealt with in this branch.

Miscellaneous enquiries, collection of taxes animals etc., are also done through Mauzadars and Gaonburas under this branch. They are also recognised as village chief authorities under the North Cachar Hills District (Administration Of Justice) Rules 1953 and are functioning as village courts.

The Secretary to the Executive Committee is the Revenue Officer of the District Council and exercises such powers as are vested in the Deputy Commissioner under Assam Land and Revenue Regulation Act 1886. Appeal against the order of the Revenue Officer lies with the Executive Member in-charge of the Land Revenue Portfolio.

Forest Branch : The administration of Forest (Unclassed State Forests ) in North Cachar Hills is vested with the District Council and this Branch looks after the management of Unclassed State Forests . All matters relating to assessment and collection of royalties on various forest produce together with settlement of forest mahals are made by this branch.

Royalty on forest produce is levied as per schedule prescribed for the purpose ,and in addition, a monopoly fee is charged upto the maximum of 50 % of the royalty , This fee varies according to the remoteness and inaccessibility of the working area. Timber and firewood are exploited under the system of trade permits and occasionally a firewood coupe is also formed and sold by calling tenders. Mahals have been formed for the working of minor forest produce. Exclusive right for collection of such forest produce from mahals is sold by calling tenders. Outside the mahals exploitation of such forest produce is done on permit system.

The administration of the minor minerals in the Autonomous District of North Cachar Hills is a State subject and the District Council of the North Cachar Hills is entitled to get a share of 60% of the revenue accrued therefrom. The District Council is authorised by the State Govt. to collect revenue on minor minerals within its jurisdiction. The revenue is shared by the District Council and State Govt. on the basis of 60 : 40. Administration of Reserved Forests have also been transferred to the District Council in recent years.

Public Worked Branch : The branch is under the charge of an Engineer, who supervises the execution of all works, construction as well as repairs i.e., works relating to rural communication , rural water supply, self-help schemes, construction and maintenance of District Council 's offices and buildings. Engineer is assisted by an Assistant Engineer and 4 overseers. Besides, there are a number of sub-overseers and Moharrirs for better execution and supervision of works.

Education Branch : Education at the primary level within the autonomous District is under the control and management of the District Council . The Council has 14 L.P. Schools of its own which it manages from its own fund and is shouldering the responsibility of the management and control of 214 Govt. L.P. Schools and 6 Junior Basic Schools transferred from Govt. with effect from 1.4.64. To supervise the workings and teaching of these schools, there is a District Board of Primary Education consisting of 9 members. Executive Members in-charge of Education Portfolio is the Chairman and Deputy Inspector of Schools , Haflong who is ex-officio Secretary of the Board.

Financial Affairs Branch : This branch consists of two sub-branches : (i) Budgets and accounts and (ii) Taxes, the former dealing with financial matters like the preparation of budgets, including preparation and sanction of various schemes of works and maintenance of accounts and cash ; the latter is entrusted with the administration of the North Cachar Hills District (Trading By Non-Tribals) Regulation 1954. The North Cachar Hills District (Taxes) Regulation 1953 and the North Cachar Hills District (Taxes On Entry Of Goods Into The Markets) Regulation 1959. It issues licenses to non-tribal traders under the North Cachar Hills District (Trading By Non-Tribals) Regulation 1954 on payment of prescribed fees and levies - taxes on professions, traders, callings and employment under the North Cachar Hills District (Taxes) Regulation 1953. The tax is levied on an annual gross income of a person or persons as per schedule.

Collection of entry taxes under the North Cachar Hills District (Taxes On Entry Of Goods Into The Markets) Regulation 1959 are done through this branch. For this purpose whole of the North Cachar Hills is divided into seven regions for collection purposes. At each region there is agent called ''Permit Issuing Agent'' who levies taxes through permits as per schedule rates on the scheduled goods.

The Secretary to the District Council is in over-all charge of these branches mentioned above. He is also the Secretary to the Executive Committee as well as the Secretary for Legislature. Besides general supervision he implements the decision of the Executive Committee and the Council and on financial sides he exercises control over the Council Fund as empowered by the Fund Rules. There is an Assistant Secretary to the Executive Committee to assist the Secretary in discharging his multifarious activities.

Executive Committee : According to Rule 28 and 29 of the Assam Autonomous District (Constitution of the District Council s) Rules 1951, all the executive functions of the District Council s are vested in the Executive Committee . The Executive Committee in case of North Cachar Hills is composed of the Chief Executive Member at the head and two other Executive Members. The subject falling under the purview of the District Council are allotted to the three members of the Executive Committee .

The emoluments of the members of the Executive Committee , Chairman , Deputy Chairman and Members of the District Council (M.D.C.) at present are as follows :-

1. Chief Executive Member (1) Salary Rs.500/- per month.
(2)Car maintenance allowance Rs.50 p.m.
(3)House rent in-lieu of free residence Rs.150/- P.M.
2. Executive Member    (1) Salary Rs.400/- per month.
 (2)Car maintenance allowance Rs.50 p.m.
(3)House rent in-lieu of free residence Rs.150/- P.M.
3. Chairman (1) Salary Rs.400/- per month
(2)House rent in-lieu of free residence Rs.150/- P.M.
4. Deputy Chairman Salary of Rs.200/- p. m.
5. Members of District Council .     Salary of Rs.125/- p. m.