Contents  
Chapter- 1: General
Chapter- 2: History
Chapter- 3: People
Chapter- 4: Agriculture & Irrigation
Chapter- 5: Industries
Chapter - 6: Banking, Trade & Commerce
Chapter - 7: Communications
Chapter - 8: Miscellenous Occupation
Chapter - 9: Economic Trends Part 1
Chapter - 9: Economic Trends Part 2
Chapter - 10: General Administration
Chapter - 11: Revenue Aministration
Chapter - 12 : Law & Order and Justice
Chapter - 13 : Other Departments
Chapter - 14 : Local Self Government Part1
Chapter - 14 : Local Self Government Part2
Chapter - 14 : Local Self Government Part3
Chapter - 15 : Education and Culture
Chapter - 16 : Medical & Public Health Services
Chapter - 17 : Other Social Services

 

Chapter - 18 :  Public Life and Voluntary Social Service Organisations
Chapter - 19 : Places of Interest
Chapter - 20 : Glossary

CHAPTER - XVI

MEDICAL AND PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICES

SURVEY OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND MEDICAL FACILITIES IN EARLY TIME :

No record concerning medical and public health services in the early times in the district is available. These , in the sense we understand them, may be considered to have been non-existent in the district. The people in the district belonging to tribes at different levels of culture believed in charms and incantations and had faith in propitiating and invoking different gods and spirits as a means of curing sickness. In the Karbi pantheon there are gods like those of Ajo-ase (the night fever ) So-memo (evil pain) etc., which must be propitiated when a man is suffering from those maladies. Sometimes country herbs are also applied for curing the sick man along with propitiation of the spirits. As in other tribal societies the man of medicine occupied an important place.

The western system of medicine was introduced in this region by the Christian Missionaries in the early part of the 20 th century. As the district of United Mikir and North Cachar Hills came into existence in 1951, incorporating portions of three plains districts and one hill district viz. Sibsagar, Nowgong, Cachar, and United khasi & Jaintia Hills, the Medical and Public Health administration of these districts looked after the need of the respective portions prior to the formation of the district. But medical and public health facilities in the areas comprising the present district were , however, very meagre and there were but few centres where these were available.

(b) VITAL STATISTICS : The vital statistics at the lower level in the rural areas are submitted as a matter of procedure by the village headman to the Mauzadar , who in turn compiles his Mauza figures and submits them to the Civil Surgeon or the Sub-divisional Medical officer as the ease may be. The tea garden authorities supply their figures directly to the Civil Surgeon or the Sub-divisional Medical officer. In the urban areas , such figures are supplied by the town committees and municipal boards and submitted either to the Civil Surgeon or the Sub-divisional officer as the case may. All figures thus collected are finally compiled in the office of the Civil Surgeon for onward transmission to the Govt.

However, the collection of vital statistics in the State is admitted to be defective. The figures indicating the natural increase of population according to vital statistics do not tally with those of the censuses. Nature of population increase is not fully reflected in the vital statistics. It is reported that births are more often omitted than deaths. The main drawback with the collection of vital statistics in the State is that , registration of birth and death is not compulsory except in the tea gardens. Reporting of the birth and death is not an obligation on the part of the house-holders. Its prime collecting agent is Gaonbura, a village headman who is very often illiterate, invariably low paid, and burdened with many other duties. The following table shows the figures of the vital statistics for the session 1952-1960 :-

Year

Total number of births

Total number of deaths

Total increase of birth over death

Percentage increase birth of over death

1952

1953

1954

1955

1956

1957

1958

1959

1960

303

545

80

551

412

299

327

187

203

228

237

50

343

239

134

85

34

49

+75

+308

+30

+203

+173

+165

+242

+153

+154

24.75

56.51

37.50

36.84

41.99

51.11

74.00

81.82

75.86

Among the important causes of mortality in the fifties, deaths due to malaria were the highest. It was followed by fever , dysentry, diarrhoea, and respiratory diseases. Child birth was also an important cause of death. But due to anti-malaria measures incidence of death due to malaria almost became negligible, only fever, dysentry, diarrhoea, respiratory diseases continued to be the major causes of mortality in the district. The dust nuisance, mal-nutrition, the high humidity of climate , want of requisite minerals in water , are said to be some of the factors that affect the health of the people. The water-borne diseases generally occur after floods in flood-affected areas in the district . The following table shows the selected causes of death in the district .

1. Census of India 1961 , Assam, District Census Handbook, United Mikir and North Cachar Hills,

 

(c) DISEASES COMMON TO THE DISTRICT :

Leprosy:

Leprosy is hyperendemic in the district . It is mainly found in the hills of the Karbi though cases are not uncommon in the North Cachar Hills also. The prevalence rate as per survey was as high as 1.5 percent. There are about 4,000 cases under treatment in the treatment centres maintained by the Government. But mortality rate is considered to be low. Generally, the leprosy affected people die of some other inter-current disease. The causes of spreading of this fell disease may be attributed to their unhygienic environment, unclean habits, shabby clothings and ill balanced diet.

Leprosy patients treated in 1962, 1963 and 1968 were 4,493, 6,273 and 4,699 respectively. The introduction of D.D.S. (Dapsone) has revolutionised the treatment of Leprosy . The disease is now curable. The patients are given domiciliary treatment. They are allowed to stay in their own houses and do their normal works and at the same time receive treatments at Leprosy Treatment Centres situated nearby their houses. There are about 109 centres functioning in the district with one Leprosy worker in each centre. The Leprosy worker is advised to treat the Leprosy patient who can not come to the centre, at his own house. There is one Leprosy colony at Maibong, and two other Leprosy colonies at Sonapur and Malasipathar are under construction. The colony admits needy Leprosy patients for temporary hospitalisation.2 Some social service organisations like the Shreemanta Sankar Mission and Mikir Hills Seva Kendra are taking active part in the Leprosy eradication programme. They haveestablished colonies and opened out-door treatment centres. Shreemanta Sankar Mission , Nowgong has established , one 15 bedded Leprosy colony at Ouguri and out-door treatment centres at Ouguri, Ghilani, Tumpreng, Borthal, Satgaon, Kumarikata, Bhuragaon and Chapnala. The number of Leprosy patient treated in these centres was 601 and 629 during 1967 and 1968 respectively. The Mikir Hills Seva Kendra , Sarihajan besides outdoor treatment centre at Balipathar, Saphapani, and upper Deopani. The patients treated in the centres maintained by the Kendra came to 327 and 611 in 1967 and 1969 respectively. The Asom Seva Samiti is also running one Leprosy colony at Kuthori and some outdoor treatment centres on the out-skirts of Karbi .2

Malaria:Malaria is the most important public health problem of the district . It will be evident from the figures that in 1957 out of 66,988 total patients treated in Karbi , malaria alone accounted for 16,818 . Although anti-malaria measures on limited scale was going on for several years, a separate unit under the Malaria Eradication Programme was started only in October, 1957 . This unit covers the whole of Karbi divided into three sub-units with headquarters at Howraghat, Diphu , and Sarupathar. For North Cachar Hills there is another sub-unit at Maibong under the control of Assistant Malaria Officer, Silchar.

D.D.T. spraying operations are carried out by these sub-units in their respective areas twice a year, each spraying operation lasting for a period of three months. In the interval period of spraying operations, assessment work is carried out to find out result of spraying operations. Presumtive and medical treatment are also provided simultaneously. That anti-Malaria operations have yielded good result is evident from the following table :-

Year of Assessment rate

Spleen

rate

Parasite rate

Infant Parasite rate

Patient treateds

Patients cured

Assessment result before the operation started in 1957

65.57%

43.8%

47.9%

66,988

16,818

Assessment result after two rounds of D.D.T. operation in1957

26.3%

9.5%

17.4%

61,591

13,311

Assessment result after 4th round of D.D.T. In 1959

23.3%

6%

7%

73,037

9,434

Malaria is caused due to the introduction of malaria parasite into human blood by Anopheles mosquito. The disease is common almost through out the district , but it is in high rate in the foot-hill areas.

In the annual surveillances carried out in Karbi by the Diphu unit in 1966, 1967 and 1968, blood smears collected and examined were 47,721 , 40,261 and 41,414 . Of these 3,871 , 4,558 and 4,432 were positive cases .Number of cases treated during these years respectively came to 1,721 ,3,855 and 1,542. The following table shows the achievement of spraying operations in Karbi in 1968.3

Round

Villages

Houses human dwellings

Cow-sheds

Population

Consumption of D.D.T.

1st

2nd.

additional round

2,080

881

1,425

1,05,496

38,578

52,906

59,084

18,718

88,890

3,32,193

1,52,203

3,49,070

50,194 Lbs.

15,514 ,,

25,299 ,,

Typhoid : The disease shows up and down trend over the previous year with a tendency of rise in the recent years but with no death. Anti-typhoid inoculation as a preventive measure against typhoid are given from time to time and T.A.B. Vaccine has been made available in all Government hospitals in the district . The typhoid cases treated are as follows :

Year

Cases treated

Year

Cases treated

Year

Cases treated

1955

1956

1957

1958

1959

7

14

8

9

26

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

13

14

22

24

150

1965

1966

1967

1968

134

164

123

135

Tuberculosis : Tuberculosis continues to be a problem in the district as elsewhere. The extent of its prevalence can not be correctly determined in absence of any authoritative survey. Probably majority of the cases remain undetected and untreated and as such the number of T.B. patients treated in hospitals and dispensaries should not be taken as an indicative of its extent. T.B. wards for indoor patients are available in the Civil Hospitals at Haflong and Diphu . The following table will give as idea about the number of T.B. patients treated in the district from 1955 to 1961.

Year

Number of Patients treated

Year

Number of Patients treated

1955

1956

1957

1958

1959

1960

1961

159

147

184

208

166

223

180

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

176

127

146

169

200

186

183

Cholera : The district may be said to be free from cholera epidemic. Only in 1961, two cases of cholera were reported. As preventive measures anti-cholera inoculations are given every year. The following figures will show the inoculation performed :-

Year

Persons inoculated

Year

Persons inoculated

1954

1955

1956

1957

1958

1,336

10,936

1,678

1,914

1,151

1959

1960

1961

1962

1963

880

3,013

9,864

9,023

11,551

Small-pox : The district may almost be regarded as free from the small-pox . From 1961 to 1968, only a few cases of attack were reported. The usual vaccination and mass vaccination against small-pox have been performed in the district . The vaccinations are performed by Vaccinators, Sanitary Inspectors, Health Assistants and Rural Health Inspectora. There is a para-Medical Assistant in the district to supervise their works. Leaflets and posters containing instructions to save from the small- pox are widely distributed through field staff and medical institutions. Every year Small-pox Week is observed and mass vaccination programme is taken during the week.

Dysentry, Diarrhoea and Influenza : The incidence of these diseases are maintaining upward trend as indicated by the following figures :-

Year

Dysentery & Diarrhoea

Influenza

Year

Dysentery & Diarrhoea

Influenza

1955

1956

1957

1958

1959

1960

1961

870

1,326

2,666

3,831

3,442

4,226

4,182

271

899

1,996

2,859

2,848

2,920

2,837

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967

1968

4,323

5,262

4,788

5,905

7,092

4,183

5,957

2,706

2,121

1,774

1,663

1,478

1,501

1,666

Goitre : About 3 percent of the district population is said to be suffering from goitre. It is caused due to the deficiency of required quantity of iodine in the drinking water which causes enlargement of said gland in the neck. There is no fear of mortality from the disease itself except disfigurement of the person suffering from it.

Under the Goitre Control Scheme sponsored by the Govt. of India, two Goitre Treatment Centres in Assam are located at Gouripur in Goalpara district and Diphu in United Mikir and North Cachar Hills District. Jurisdiction of the Goitre Unit, Diphu extends over a number of districts including Lakhimpur, Sibsagar, Nowgong, Cachar, Mizo Hills and the United Mikir and North Cachar Hills .The function of the unit is to map out the areas having a large number of goitre cases and after locating such endemic areas to distribute iodized salt among the population for the prevention of goitre. There is, however, no separate dispensary or hospital for the treatment of goitre cases. The goitre patients are treated in general hospitals and dispensaries with other patients.

2. From the report of State Leprosy Office , Gauhati.

3. All the figures relate to Karbi only , No detail figures for North Cachar Hills are available.

(d) PUBLIC HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES

As mentioned elsewhere the western system of medicine was introduced into this area by the Christian missionaries who distributed patent medicines to the needy people in the early part of the 20th century. It is not known when the first hospital or dispensary was established in the areas comprising this district but there were only 5 dispensaries and one Civil Hospital at Haflong when the district was constituted on 17th November, 1951. As this district constituted out of portions of the districts of Sibsagar, Nowgong , Cachar and United khasi and Jaintia Hills, the administration of Medical and Public Health Services was carried out from the head-quarters of the aforesaid districts. The Office of the Civil Surgeon was first established at Haflong in the year 1952 but since Diphu was selected as the head-quarter of the district , the Office of the Civil Surgeon was shifted to Diphu in the year 1960 with the construction of the Civil Hospital and Staff quarters etc., there.

Previously Public Health and Medical Services were two separate services under the control of the District Medical Officer of Health and Civil Surgeon respectively at the district level. But now the services are amalgamated together and brought under the control of the Civil Surgeon as the principal medical authority in the district .

There are now three Hospitals, sixteen State Dispensaries, 4 Travelling Dispensaries and nine Primary Health Centres. Of the three Hospitals, two are Civil Hospitals located at Haflong and Diphu and one State Hospital at Maibong. The State Dispensaries are located at Mohendijua, Dolamora, Dengaon, Kolonga, Borgaon, Umpani, Dhansiri,Baithalangso, Bakulia and Rongpongbong in Karbi and at Harangajao, Garampani, Mahur, Hajadisa, Laisong and Bor-Arkap in North Cachar Hills .Besides, there are eight sub-centres of treatment in the district . Travelling Dispensaries as the name implies mainly cater to the medical needs of the interior areas by frequent visits. These medical institutions are doing effective works in attending curative side of medicine. Side by side with these hospitals and dispensaries, there are nini Primary Health Centres which attend both to the preventive and curative sides of the diseases. The Primary Health Centres are at Howraghat , Bokajan, Dokamukam, Baithalangso and Umpani in Karbi and at Langting, Mahur and Ganjung in North Cachar Hills . These centres are provided with usual hospital staff.

In 1968, there were twenty one doctors (12 Assistant Surgeon 1 and 9 Assistant Surgeon 11 ), thirty one Pharmacists, twelve Nurses and twenty one Midwives and two Ayurveidc Physicians serving in the hospitals and dispensaries of the district . The bed strength in Government medical institutions had increased from 25 in 1952 to 142 in 1968. Besides, there is a rural staff consisting of Rural Health Inspectors, Health Assistants and Sanitary Inspectors. They mainly deal with the preventive side of treatment and advise the public on cleanliness, use of good drinking water etc., which help in a large way in avoiding the spread of diseases. They are assisted by seasonal Vaccinators and non-seasonal Vaccinators in giving vaccinations to the people.

Besides State Government hospitals and dispensaries , the North East Frontier Railway (N.F.Rly) is also running two dispensaries at Lower Haflong and Harangajao in North Cachar Hills . There is a proposal to establish another dispensary at Maibong. These dispensaries are for providing medical treatment to the railway employees. Each dispensaries is manned by one Doctor and other para medical staff like Dispenser, Hospital Attendents, Sanitary Cleaners and Dressers. There are also emergency beds in the two dispensaries to cope with emergent cases and if any case demands hospitalisation, it is shifted either to the Lumding Divisional Hospital or Badarpur Sub-divisional Hospital for further treatment where all facilities are available.

Maternity, Child Welfare & Family Planning : A separate Bureau for implementation of the Family Planning schemes was started in the district in 1965 under the charge of the District Family Planning Medical Officer. In 1968, Maternity and Child Welfare Schemes were also transferred to this Bureau for better coordination and implementation. Two Static Sterilisation Units are operating under the Bureau at Haflong Civil Hospital and Diphu CIlvi Hospital. Family Planning Clinics are operating at Howraghat Public Health Centre, Dengaon State Dispensary, Mohindijua State Dispensary , Bokajan Public Health Centre, Baithalangso Public Health Centre, Maibong State Hospital, Garampani State Dispensary and Harangajao State Dispensary. Maternity and Child Welfare Centres are functioning at Dengaon State Dispensary in Karbi and Laisong State Dispensary in North Cachar Hills . Besides the establishment of the these institutions, the Bureau has also undertaken the following two schemes :-

(1) Immunisation of pre-school going children with Triple Vaccine and mother against titanus and

(2) Prophilexes against mal-nutrition among the pre-school going children and mothers.

Orientation Training Camps for village leaders are held once a year in the district to train them into Maternity and Child Welfare and Family Planning Schemes. Family Planning fortnights are usually observed twice a year to gear up performances in the district . The following table shows the achievement of the Family Planning Bureau :-

Schemes

1965-66

1966-67

1967-68

1968-69

1. I. U. C . D.

2.Vesectomy

3.Tubectomy

4.Conventional contraceptives

5.General meeting

6.Cinema show

7.Group meeting

8.Distribution of posters, booklets and leaflets.

9.Exhibitions

26

1

1

218

 

7

Nil

21

455

 

 

3

290

4

3

735

 

19

26

38

1,069

 

 

8

422

Nil

4

1,034

 

39

76

53

2,857

 

 

14

288

19

4

1,316

43

77

163

3,514

14

(e) PRIVATE HOSPITALS AND NURSING HOMES :

The district has eight private dispensaries , two sub-centres of these dispensaries , and one private eye hospital besides the leprosy , colonies and treatment centres described earlier. Of these eight dispensaries, six are run by the management of tea estates, viz., Lengree T.E. , Lahorijan T.E., Depani T.E.,Nambarnadi T.E.,Bogijan T.E.,and Borpathar T.E., and remaining dispensaries are run by the social service organisations, i. e., Shreemanta Sankar Mission, Nowgong , and Mikir Hills Sevakendra, Sariahjan. Shreemanta Sankar Mission, Nowgong is running one eye Hospital and dispensary at Ouguri. The dispensary at Sariahjan is under the control of the Mikir Hills Sevakendra ,Sariahjan. Facilities for beds are available in dispensaries at Deopani and Nambarnadi. These dispensaries cater to the medical needs of the rural people and tea garden labour as most of them are located in the rural areas of the district .

Besides, there are some private doctors, allopethic as well as homeopathic , doing their practices in the district . The numbers of such doctors could not be ascertained.

(f) PROTECTED WATER SUPPLY :

Urban Water Supply Schemes : We have briefly mentioned the water supply arrangement in the two urban areas, i.e. , Haflong and Diphu. The water supply scheme for Diphu in Karbi is under the execution of the Public Health Engineering Division, Jorhat and the Water Supply Scheme for Haflong is executed by the Public Health Engineering Division, Silchar.

Under the Natural Water Supply and Sanitation Programme during the Second Five Year Plan, a water supply scheme was taken up at Diphu , the source of water supply being the deep tube-well with arrangements for disturbing the water through gravity mains and over head tanks. But underground conditions made the D.T.W. (Deep Tube Well) system a complete failure. Water Supply from the D.T.W. was insufficient and there was high iron and hydrogen sulphide content in it. These impurities being highly injurious for human beings, the water supply has to be discontinued.

Under the new scheme sanctioned in 1964-65, it is proposed to draw water by pumping from the river Lungi, 30 kms. away from Diphu , by gravity through a 9'' dia cast-iron pipe line. The first phase of the scheme which comprise the construction of 130 ft. long R.C.C. pick up weir across the river Lungi at Siloni, treatment plant, laying of raw water pumping main, clear water gravity-main from Siloni to Diphu town with pillars and valve chambers and construction of approach roads etc., is likely to cost Rupees fifty lakhs. The filtered water brought from the Siloni will be stored in two service reservoirs of 10,000 gallons capacity each in the town and will be distributed to the people utilizing the existing distribution system. The second phase of the scheme which will comprise improving the existing distributing system is likely to be sanctioned shortly.

Water Supply from the existing water works at Haflong is considered insufficient to meet the requirement of the growing population of the town. A new scheme has been proposed to augment the water supply of the town. Under the scheme water from the Boradolong stream about eleven kms. from Haflong town will be brought down to the town by gravity to the present service reservoir site. Filtered water after disinfection shall be pumped to Bagetar Tilla to cover the higher areas of the town. The rest low lying areas will be covered from existing service reservoir site. Capacity of the proposed service reservoir at Bagetar Tilla will be 15,000 gallons and will meet the requirement of approximately 2,000 souls. The scheme is likely to be completed in 1973-74.

Rural Water Supply Scheme : The Rural Water Supply Schemes such as sinking of tube wells , construction of ring wells etc. in villages are under way in various rural areas of the district . These are mainly constructed under the Public Health Scheme and local development scheme. The main agencies engaged in the task of rural water supply are Public Health Engineering Department and the District Council s of Karbi and North Cachar Hills . The water supply scheme for Diphu and Haflong are likely to cover some neighbouring rural areas also. But the protected water supply in the hill regions of the district is still a problem . As the villages are generally located in the hill tops, they have to fetch water from the small streams flowing at a low level of 200 to 300 feet. This peculiarity of the hill region comlined with the habit of shifting villages in search of new jhuming areas or on any other pretext are the main obstacles for the successful implementation of protected water supply schemes in such areas. A brief description of the Rural Water Supply Scheme has already been given in the earlier chapter.

During the Fourth Five Year Plan , emphasis will be on supply of tap water to the rural areas. Survey work of the few such schemes both in Karbi and North Cachar Hills have already been completed. Bargaon Water Supply Scheme and Baithalangso Water Supply Scheme in Karbi at a cost of rs.2,38,000/- and Rs.2,14,000/- respectively have been taken up during the Fourth Plan Period. The first will benefit about 1,000 persons. Under this scheme water is proposed to be brought through gravity main from the Suridong stream situated at 4.7kms from the Bargaon village. There will be R.C.C. dam across the stream and treatment plant will be constructed near the village . Filter water will be distributed to the consumers through G.I. Pipes.

Under the Baithalangso Water Supply Scheme , water is to be tapped from the perennial streams in Tika Hills and flowing into the Barapani river by construction a R.C.C. intake chamber. The water will then be allowed to flow by gravity through a 6 dia. water main. The treatment plant is proposed to be constructed near the intake point. The water from the treatment plant will gravitate through the underdrainage system to the service reservoir. It will be ground level R.C.C. reservoir with an intake capacity of 7,500 gallons. Other water supply schemes likely to be taken up in the ensuing plan periods in the rural areas of the district are Donkamukam, Bokajan, Bakuli, Taradubi, Kheronighat, Jirikinding, Sariahjan, Barmarjong, Dokmoka, Howaipur, Phuloni and Nambar Adarshagaon.

In the North Cachar Hills , fourteen rural water supply schemes covering 49 villages with a population of 15,024 are proposed to be completed during the Fourth Five Year Plan. Further it is proposed to undertake extensive survey and intensive investigation work including exploration of under ground water with in the 4th Plan period.

APPENDIX - I

Statement showing the numbers of Leprosy colonies and outdoor centres, indoor and outdoor patients treated and number of beds in the district of United Mikir and North Cachar Hills in 1961.

Name of Colony and Centre

Inpatient treated

Out patient treated

Number of beds

1.Maibong Leprosy Colony

2.Dolamara Dispensary centre

3.Phulani ,, ,,

4.Dengaon ,, ,,

5.Baithlangso ,, ,,

6.Mohindijua ,, ,,

7.Diphu Civil Hospital

8.Dolamara Out-Centre

9.Malasipathar ,,

10.Dadhara ,,

11.Kakajan ,,

12.Kohora

13.Diring ,,

14.Longlokse ,,

15.Somilangso ,,

16.Sonapur ,,

17.Bokolia ,,

18.Jaipung ,,

19.Bagapani ,,

20.Dokmoka ,,

21.Meteka ,,

22.Kaskok ,,

23.Osoroserop ,,

24.Lengri ,,

25.Amtreng ,,

40

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

81

 

45

98

35

50

30

25

91

25

82

32

30

75

32

93

72

73

63

22

33

61

21

45

48

40

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

40

1262

40


Name of Colony and Centre

Inpatient treated

Out patient treated

Number of beds

Under Sreemanta Sankar Mission

1.Ouguri Leprosy Colony

2.Kolonga Out Centre

3.Ghilani ,,

4.Borthal ,,

5.Tumperang ,,

6.Kumarikata ,,

7.Umpanai ,,

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

125

219

115

16

54

30

35

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

20

594

20

Under Assam Seva Samiti

1.Kuthori Leprosy Colony

2.Deopani Out Centre

3.Rongapara ,,

4.Phulaguri ,,

5.Shilimkhoa ,,

40

-

-

-

-

228

24

47

28

57

40

-

-

-

-

 

40

384

40

Under Mikir Hills Seva Kendra

1.Sarihajan Leprosy Colony

2.Saphapani Out Centre

3.Upper Deopani ,,

4.Deopani ,,

18

-

-

-

-

175

 

72

99

110

20

 

-

-

-

 

18

456

20

APPENDIX - II

 

Distribution of medical personnels in the hospital and dispensaries of this district in 1961.

Table

APPENDIX -III

Statement showing the number of beds, indoor and outdoor patients treated and surgical operations etc. in the medical institutions of United Mikir and North Cachar Hills district from 1952 to 1961.

Year

No. of beds

No. of indoor patient treated

No. of outdoor patient treated

No. of death

No. of surgical operation

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

1952

1953

1954

1955

1956

1957

1958

1959

1960

1961

25

25

26

26

32

32

36

40

82

82

14

14

18

18

18

20

20

20

48

48

316

457

435

356

448

587

689

818

1,292

1,465

149

195

320

148

93

156

192

236

462

527

12,680

19,932

34,796

36,273

41,619

53,240

75,901

81,249

97,324

1,01,491

4,456

6,214

8,922

10,599

10,499

17,944

19,441

28,345

25,215

31,052

10

11

9

7

10

8

9

8

9

17

3

6

48

104

112

91

75

85

161

162

APPENDIX -IV

 

Statement showing the facilities avilable in private medical institutions of United Mikir and North Cachar Hills district, 1961.

Sl.No

Name of private institutions

No.of dispensaries

No.of beds

No.of doctors

No.of midwives

No.of nurses

Any other medical personnel

 

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

1

Lengree T.E.

1

-

-

-

-

1 Compounder

2

Lahorijan & Nirmal Kumar T.E.

1

-

1

-

-

1Dresser

3

Deopani T.E.

1

10

1

-

1

1 Compounder

4

Nambornadi T.E.

1

12

1

1

1

1 Compounder

5

Bogijan T.E.

1

-

1

-

1

1 Compounder

6

Borpathar T.E.

1

-

1

-

1

-

7

Shankar Mission

(1)Eye Hospital, Ouguri

(2)Leprosy Colony at Ouguri

(3)Dispensaries at

(a) Ouguri

(b) Tumpreng

(c) Ghilani

(d) Kumarkata

1 Eye Hospital

 

1 Leprosy Colony 20

4 Dispensaries

25

 

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

7

 

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

3

 

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

2

 

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

2

 

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

8

Mikir Hills Seva Kendra

  1. Leprosy Colony at Sarupathar

  2. Preventoria at Sarihajan

  3. Dispensary at Sarihajan

  4. Out-Centres at Saphapani Deopani Upper, Bilaspathar

 

 

1Leprosy colony

1 Preventoria

 

1 Dispensary

 

3 Out-Centre

 

 

20

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

 

1

 

N.A

 

1

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

 

N.A

 

-

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

 

N.A

 

-

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

 

N.A

 

-

 

N.A

9

Assam Seva Samity

  1. Leprosy Colony at Kuthori

  2. Out centres at

    Deopani, Rangapara, Phulani and Sitenkhown

 

1 Leprosy Colony

 

4 out-centres

 

40

 

 

N.A

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

 

N.A

 

 

N.A

 

 

APPENDIX -V

Statement showing patients treated in private medical institutions of United Mikir and North Cachar Hills district, 1961-1963

Sl.No

Name of private institutions

No.of Indoor patient treated

No. of Outdoor patient treated

1961

1962

1963

1961

1962

1963

1

Lengree T.E.

-

-

-

130

140

160

2

Lahorijan & Nirmal Kumar T.E.

-

-

-

1,556

1,651

1,125

3

Deopani T.E.

32

32

13

1,611

1,594

1,723

4

Nambornadi T.E

232

248

296

3,951

3,541

4,426

5

Bogijan T.E.

-

-

-

593

553

301

6

Borpathar T.E.

-

-

-

N.A.

N.A.

N.A.

7

Shankar Mission

(1)Eye Hospital, Ouguri

(2)Leprosy Colony at Ouguri

(3)Dispensaries at

(a) Ouguri

(b) Tumpreng

(c) Ghilani (d)KumarkataShankar Mission

 

169

 

17

 

N.A

 

 

280

 

19

 

N.A

 

331

 

19

 

N.A

 

4,962

 

N.A

 

7,980

 

 

 

5,162

 

N.A

 

8,394

 

5,303

 

N.A

 

9,352

8

Mikir Hills Seva Kendra

(1)Leprosy Colony at Sarupathar

(2)Preventoria at Sarihajan

(3)Dispensary at Sarihajan

(4)Out-Centres at Saphapani Deopani Upper, Bilaspathar

 

 

20

 

 

 

 

N.A

 

 

20

 

 

 

 

N.A

 

 

20

 

 

 

 

N.A

 

 

 

N.A

 

 

 

 

N.A

 

 

518

 

 

 

 

N.A

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

6,183

9

Assam Seva Samity

  1. Leprosy Colony at Kuthori

  2. Out centres at

    Deopani, Rangapara, Phulani and Sitenkhown

 

40

 

N.A

 

N.A

 

N.A

 

N.A

 

N.A

 

228

 

N.A

 

N.A

 

N.A

 

-

 

N.A

APPENDIX -VI

 

Statement showing the allocation of rupees in the district for Rural Water Supply Scheme.

Name of sub-division

1959-60

1960-61

1961-62

1962-63

1963-64

Karbi Anglong

79,289

21,245

47,343

1,39,9251

79,502

North Cachar Hills

15,144

21,433

28,600

13,622

2,143

Total

94,433

42,678

75,943

1,53,547

1,53,547

Includes Rs.91000/-Includes Rs.91000/- allotted to District Council Karbi Anglong1