MODERN PERIOD
The Ahoms ruled Assam uninterruptedly for six hundred years. They established a strong and stable government, gave peace and prosperity and happiness to their subjects and successfully resisted many foreign invasions. But during the closing years of the Ahom rule, on account of the incompetence and inefficiency of the monarchs and mutual rivalry among nobles, the Ahom monarchy fell into decadence. For the Burmese it was a favorable opportunity to interfere in the internal affairs of the Ahom kingdom.   After the first Burmese invasion, Badan Chandra regained his power, and taking a huge amount of indemnity they went back to Burma. The second invasion of Burmese took place in 1819. This time round, the Burmese wanted to annex Assam to the Burmese dominions. They soon became greedier and created disturbances in areas under British control – the British soon declared war against them.
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THE TREATY OF YANDABOO (1826.)
In accordance with the treaty of Yandaboo,1826, the king of Ava surrendered his claims over Assam and the neighboring states of Cachar, Jaintia and Manipur hills to the British government.   In the South-East, to ensure the security of the frontier, Scott entered into agreements with several chiefs of the Singphos. The Khamti and the Muttocks chiefs, in their separate treaties, undertook to furnish labor and militiamen in the case of an emergency.
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THE FIRST INDIAN WAR OF INDEPENDENCE AND ASSAM (1857)
Assam lost her independence in 1826 to the British. During the first thirty years of British rule, the struggle for independence was among the nobles and the higher classes.   The British termed it as the Sepoy Mutiny. Soon, several princes, nobles and the Sepoys of the British Government had joined forces under the banner of ‘war for independence'. Maniram came to know about it, and revealed the same to Kandarpeswar Singha.
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THE FREEDOM STRUGGLE IN ASSAM (1921-1947):
In 1921, the Provincial Congress Committee of Assam was formed. Kuladhar Chaliha was the first president of the Provincial Congress. The freedom movement in Assam gained much strength from this time onwards. Mahatma Gandhi visited Assam in August 1921. His presence in person and the speech delivered by him in the meeting deeply touched the minds of the people of Assam. Responding his call, the lawyers, government officers, and teachers left their jobs to devote themselves to the cause of the nation.   As a result some new schools were established – these were the Kamrup Academy of Guwahati, Sibsagar Vidyapith and so on. The impact of the civil disobedience movement was also felt among the hill tribes.As per the provision of the Government of India Act, 1935, elections were held and Sir Muhammad Saadulla heading a coalition ministry became the first Chief Minister of Assam.
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A BRIEF HISTORICAL PROFILE OF ASSAM LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY
The Assam Legislative Assembly came into being on the day of its first sitting on April 7, 1937 in the Assembly Chamber at Shillong, the erstwhile Capital of the composite State of Assam.   The Assam Legislative Assembly had strength of 108 members and all of them were elected members. The strength of the Legislative Council (the Upper House) was not less than 21 and not more than 22 members.
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